Philippines: The Scenery

This will be my last post on the Philippines. It was a wonderful trip. If you like lots of green trees, sea and sky, smiling people, and amazing food, go there. I’ll say salamat kaayo (thank you very much), to everyone who looked after us while we were there.

These pics are of the Visayas, the middle of the archipelago. The Philippines is divided (figuratively) into three sections: Luzon (nothernmost), Visayas (central), Mindanao (southernmost). I stayed on the isle of Negros (as a volcanic island, it has black sand on the beaches). Negros is divided into two provinces: Negros Occidental (Occidental = West), and Negros Oriental (Oriental = East). I stayed mostly in Dumaguete City in Negros Oriental. According to US News, Dumaguete is one of the most affordable places to retire in the world. Look here.

Okay, so you’re wondering about the pics and thinking pagdali (hurry up)! So then, odto na ta (let’s go)!

Lake Balanan near Siaton, Negros Oriental
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Floating restaurants in Bohol Island
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Filipinos love their rice, so they grow a lot of it.
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A tour boat in Bohol.
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Typical traffic in the Visayas with bazillions of pedicabs (usually a motorcycle with a covered sidecar).
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Cambugahay Falls on Siquijor Island.
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A sculpture at the beach outside our room in Siquijor.
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Fishermen in not too deep water since the guy on the left is standing beside the boat. They still caught lots of fish.
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Sugarcane with palms in the distance in Tanjay, Negros Oriental.
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A rice patty near Tanjay.
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Apo Island as seen from Dumaguete City.
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Cebu Island as seen from Dumaguete City. Getting a sense the islands are close together?
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A typical market all through the Visayas. You can get something to drink, a snack, most basic things you need. You can find these on roadways throughout Dumaguete City and many other cities. Great prices for anything you get there. This is the 7-11 in the Visayas.
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Sunset just outside of Siaton. To the Philippines, I say, “Salamat kaayo,” (Thanks very much) for a wonderful trip.
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About EagleAye

I like looking at the serious subjects in the news and seeking the lighter side of the issue. I love satire and spoofs. I see the ridiculous side of things all the time, and my goal is to share that light-hearted view.
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12 Responses to Philippines: The Scenery

  1. julie says:

    Amazing. So glad you shared. one day…

    Like

  2. BrainRays says:

    “This will be my last post on the Philippines.” Your first sentence invokes sadness. But I’m happy you enjoyed your stay here. Thanks for visiting the Philippines! It’s really more fun here. 🙂

    Like

    • EagleAye says:

      Thanks! I guess I should say, “last post…for now.” I do intend to go back again. When Shey starts yearning for Lechon Baboy, it won’t be long until we’re going again. I had a lot of fun, I’ll be missing the Bud Bud for sure and the Lechon Manuk at Joe’s. *sigh* …and Tocino, and garlic rice, and Filipino hospitality, and…and…and… 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  3. tedstrutz says:

    Fabulous post, Eric. Thanks for sharing your photos of another part of the world.

    Like

  4. Fabulous photos of a fabulous looking place!

    Like

  5. Lyn says:

    Some lovely photos Eric. It must have been sad for you and Shey to leave. Oh, in the photo of Apo Island, what is that line of white dots? Are they fishing net floats?

    Like

    • EagleAye says:

      It was, and harder for Shey since we were staying with her family. She was already missing her mom’s cooking while we were on the plane. I think those are just buoys to mark the deep water. Glad you enjoyed the pics, and thank you! 😉

      Like

  6. susielindau says:

    Gorgeous photos! Thanks for sharing. I would love to go there someday.

    Like

    • EagleAye says:

      Thank you! You really should. Most Filipinos speak enough English to understand you and many can understand you very well. So you get the alienness of a tropical country with the ease of communication. It’s well worth it!

      Like

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