Job Security – Friday Fictioneers

Photo by: Marie Gail Stratford

Job Security

Until Director Morton entered the room, he felt good. Exxon’s new crystalline energy source proved immensely powerful and safe. No more oil spills would spoil Exxon’s name. Beside him, public relations whiz Philip Kennedy, sulked. Without environmental disasters, he’d lose his job soon.

Morton watched the crystals expanding uncontrollably. Mark Crabtree’s report obliterated his good mood.

“We can’t stop it’s growth soon enough,” said Crabtree. “We’ll probably lose New York.”

Morton groaned. 8 million people!

He turned to Kennedy, “Options, Mark?”

The PR man grinned. His job was safe. “Well, if we spin this right, we can look like the victim in this.”
_________________________________
Each week, the Friday Fictioneers band together to write flash fiction from a photo prompt. This week’s photo was provided by Marie Gail Stratford. Great photo Marie! Look here for more stories based upon the photo prompt: https://rochellewisofffields.wordpress.com/2015/02/18/20-february-2015/

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About EagleAye

I like looking at the serious subjects in the news and seeking the lighter side of the issue. I love satire and spoofs. I see the ridiculous side of things all the time, and my goal is to share that light-hearted view.
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50 Responses to Job Security – Friday Fictioneers

  1. Anyone would think that Philip may have ‘tampered’ with it so he would not lose his job…those crafty PR men!
    Great little story and it got me thinking, what if something like this happened? Interesting, but quite scary
    Well done!

    Liked by 1 person

    • EagleAye says:

      Philip doesn’t seem above it does he? Who knows? He seems more worried about his employment than the 8 million lives of New York. Philip is an evil man. He’s got to go.

      Glad it got you thinking. I like stories that do that. Thanks so much for the visit!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Ah , the PR man’s job is always safe. Alas for us. Wait until the reports come out about how the new energy source, once used, prevents all humans on the planet from reproducing!

    Liked by 1 person

    • EagleAye says:

      Yikers! I have no idea how somebody would spin that, but I’m sure a PR man could manage it. I think you’re right. PR men always have a job. Great comments. Thanks for stopping by!

      Like

  3. Lyn says:

    So typically Exxon. I was in such a good mood this morning, Eric, and now you have me wanting to smash Philip in the hooter. I’m here’s me trying to curb my violet tendencies. Philip isn’t the only one who can spin a story. However, yours are always enjoyable πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • EagleAye says:

      It is, isn’t it? After the horrible spill in the Gulf of Mexico we had all these commercials about how BP is a part of the community and cares about the environment, blah, blah. They showed pics of green fields and daisies. I thought I would gag. Let me hand you a broom handle, with my blessing, to go after Philip with. Thanks so much for the kind words, Lyn! πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Nan Falkner says:

    Dear EagleAye, Clever and devious and smart, sneaky and ruthless. All the fine qualities of a top executive of a thriving energy corporation! Great story! Nan πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Archon's Den says:

    A great little cautionary tale πŸ™‚
    In the second line, are the words ‘proved’ and ‘source’ inverted?

    Liked by 1 person

  6. afairymind says:

    The PR man’s happiness at the accident is very disturbing. Great story. πŸ™‚

    Like

  7. The PR guy comes off as a sleaze. But I think your story also highlighted, on purpose or accidentally, the costs (known or unknown) of every decision we make on energy as well as in other areas as well.

    janet

    Liked by 1 person

    • EagleAye says:

      It does, and it’s intentional. We need to make better decisions about energy, and how much we let energy companies get away with. When energy companies are posting all-time profits, it time for them to pay the lion’s share of the cost for cleanup. It’s also time to look seriously at alternative sources that are more sustainable and less polluting than the current ones.

      I normally try to write amusing stories, but I wrote this right after a very painful trip to the dentist. I wasn’t feeling especially funny at the moment. I guess I was focused “painful things” rather than humor at the time.

      Thanks for stopping in, and reading between the lines. πŸ™‚

      Like

      • We also need to be careful that we don’t go all out (or all in) for any alternatives without a pretty good idea of possible consequences and whether or not they really work (or where they might work and might not), etc. There are always unintended consequences, too, even when people are sincere in thinking they’ll work. Very complex issues but vital to explore.

        Liked by 1 person

      • EagleAye says:

        Absolutely. Replacing oil and coal will not be easy, and I can’t think of any “single” energy that could replace them. Until we have better means to store wind and solar electric power, those sources will always have critics. They can’t be relied upon 100% of the time in most areas so we could never throw all our eggs into one basket.

        Just about any kind of energy source has upsides and downsides. Trouble is, from all I’ve read, we cannot afford to dither for a variety of reasons. Changes are a’coming and we won’t like them if we’re not prepared.

        Like

  8. Isn’t that the truth! Excellent.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Dear Eric,

    Your story is more than a story, it’s a warning we all should heed…particularly the oil companies. Can you say, “Bp?” Well done, sir.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

  10. draliman says:

    I love the implication that rather than trying to spread success stories and get new customers, the only function of an oil company PR Exec is to spin the bad news πŸ™‚
    Looks like they’re going to need him in the coming days.

    Liked by 1 person

    • EagleAye says:

      Yeah, the loss of New York is going to keep him extremely busy. After Exxon’s famous skills, spinning the bad news is what their PR men are best at. Thanks for the visit! πŸ™‚

      Like

  11. Oh Danny Boy says:

    Good old Marketing strikes again. Nice!

    DJ

    Liked by 1 person

  12. gahlearner says:

    This hits home in so many places… pr people, administration, management: they all know how to keep their jobs secure while others have to pay the price. Great use of the prompt.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Sonya says:

    An Exxon spokesperson. There’s no way he could have turned out a good guy… I love the last line!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. storydivamg says:

    Oh what a great and evil story, Eric. I kind of like Philip. He’s got a survivalist instinct. (Of course, he is completely despicable, but I like his spunk.)

    All my best,
    Marie Gail

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Michael B. Fishman says:

    Sad, but unfortunately probably true 😦 If you don’t mind a little bit of nitpicky feedback, I thought the line, “No more oil spills would spoil Exxon’s name.” felt a little awkward and I wonder if it wouldn’t be smoother if “would” were changed to “to”?

    Liked by 1 person

    • EagleAye says:

      Pretty much. Sure it could be changed that way. It’s a little late to change it by now, but I certainly do appreciate your careful reading. I like constructive feedback at all times, and it’s good to know there’s people out there who are watching carefully. Thanks so much! πŸ™‚

      Like

  16. Bravo. I loved the spin and the spinster.
    I would blame it on Obama’s immigration policy allowing foreign objects to enter the country without proper oversight causing an explosive situation.
    Randy

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Bastards! Can I swear in your comments? I had another word in mind. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • EagleAye says:

      Haha! Yes, you may. You could say the other one if you wanted to, since “bastards” isn’t strong enough of a word for them. πŸ˜‰ Thanks for stopping in! πŸ™‚

      Like

  18. Love it. Typical PR man. In a nutshell!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Scary for multiple reasons! Nice story.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. milliethom says:

    Well, I can think of several adjectives to describe the self-obsessed Philip. But I won’t be boring and write them down. I really enjoyed the tale and how you’ve shown the unfolding events. I wonder exactly what Philip did to that crystal? Appropriate title. Nicely done. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • EagleAye says:

      Hehe. I can think of many for Philip. He didn’t do anything to the crystals. He’s not technical-minded at all. He’s an opportunist, and he never lets one go to waste. Glad you enjoyed, and thanks kindly! πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  21. That PR man needs to be taken and dumped right in the middle of New York City. Shame on him.This is the perfect time fora super hero to show up. Well, on to the next plan. Well done. πŸ™‚ — Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

    • EagleAye says:

      Indeed. I might have to make a follow up, and save New York. I like your idea though. Use the PR man to save the company face, then dump him into New York. It’s poetic justice. πŸ˜€ Glad you enjoyed it, Suzanne. Thanks so much! πŸ™‚

      Like

  22. Margaret says:

    Love the ending – victims inded! Great build-up, too. I can just imagine that crystal growing and growing.

    Liked by 1 person

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